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Collectivism and Violence are One

Collectivism and Violence are One

By Cobin K. Barthold | “The main idea of the novel is to portray a positively beautiful man,” Dostoevsky wrote to his niece, in an 1868 letter, of what would become The Idiot. “There is nothing more difficult in the world,” he continued, “and especially now.” By “positively beautiful man” Dostoevsky meant an infinitely humble, compassionate Christian man…. 

Vaccine Resistance and Public Trust

Vaccine Resistance and Public Trust

By Christopher Roach | During the rise and fall of the coronavirus last year, vaccines appeared more quickly than expected. Trump’s Operation Warp Speed deserved much of the credit, even though the media was reluctant to give it. Thereafter, the vaccines were rolled out aggressively. Older, more vulnerable people were first in line. Thereafter, virus incidence declined, but this result was coterminous with the seasonal rise… 

The Founding Elite vs. The Current Elite

The Founding Elite vs. The Current Elite

By Thaddeus G. McCotter | In recognizing and celebrating the signatories’ [of the Declaration of Independence] fortitude, Zanotti illuminated the stark contrast between the visions of America’s founding elite and its current elite. Without a doubt, the founding generation’s leading figures were from the colonies’ elite. Washington, Jefferson, Franklin, Adams, and their fellow preeminent revolutionaries were wealthy and celebrated…

The Death of Gratitude

The Death of Gratitude

By Jeremy Adams | When I was a boy, my father’s favorite day of the school year was not the last day, but the day before his students went on Christmas vacation. Invariably, he would come home and beckon me to his car to help him carry his “embarrassment of riches” into the house. Every year, I would gaze in wonderment into his back seat at a smorgasbord of cakes, cookies, wrapped presents, and Christmas cards, given to him by appreciative and thoughtful…

Through a Screen, Darkly

Through a Screen, Darkly

By Emina Melonic | The experience of information consumption has undergone a drastic devolution. News works on the principle of transience; but, if you will pardon the pun, this isn’t news to anyone. In the past, most people were able to differentiate between current, fast-moving, and quickly changing events and true knowledge. Let alone the question of wisdom. But these days, the pace at which everything is moving and the amount of untruth…

A Civilizational Crisis

A Civilizational Crisis

By J.D. Vance | So much of what needs to happen in the conservative movement these days is courage. Courage to respond to the threats and the reactions of the left. Courage to stand on principle. Courage to offer new ideas to new challenges. And I’m going to talk a little bit later tonight about family policy, and I have to tell you a little bit of a story, which is the last time that I spoke about family policy in Washington, D.C., I think three years ago, and my remarks were picked up…

Bleached New World

Bleached New World

By Emina Melonic | In Todd Haynes’ 1995 film, “Safe,” Julianne Moore plays an affluent housewife, Carol White. Carol leads a comfortable life with her husband and stepson. They live in an upscale home with a servant; she spends her days gardening, taking aerobics classes, and seeing her female friends. But Carol feels isolated from her environment. The relationship with her husband is polite and respectful but distant. Her stepson doesn’t much like her, and her friendships are based on social… 

Taking Literature Personally

Taking Literature Personally

By Dwight Lindley | As recent studies have shown, and numerous anecdotal accounts confirm, the mainstream English department is in declining health, and unsure of how to help itself get better. Many previous commentators have laid bare the structural sins of the discipline: hyper–politicization, specialization to the neglect of central texts… 

The Art of the Question

The Art of the Question

By Joseph Woodard | With typical ashen-gray melancholy, the old dean of St. John’s College once warned about the Great Books seminar: “You have to let a thousand golden moments just pass by… a thousand brilliant insights slip away…”  Back then, I thought he was talking about the timetable, the students, or even rules for tutoring. He was saying that and more. A great work is not a formula. It is a real thing: an old manor house with twisting corridors and hidden…